Four Tips to Revealing Your Best Self This Summer

July 24, 2015
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best selfMost people are in their best physical shape during the summer vs. winter months. Warm, sunny days make it easier to stay active and maintain a positive attitude. Many set a goal of losing weight to look their best in anticipation of attendance at major milestone celebrations like graduations and weddings.

Consider working your mental muscles by following four tried and true tips to revealing the best YOU this summer:

  1. Give thanks. Sounds so simple, yet in this technologically over-charged society focused solely on immediate gratification, we rarely communicate our appreciation to others. Dale Carnegie’s Human Relations principle #2 is ‘Give honest, sincere appreciation.’ Make a commitment to send a professional or personal note of thanks on a weekly basis to someone who went out of their way to help you. You’ll feel fantastic for sending it, and the recipient will feel even better.
  2. Turn complaints upside down. Dale Carnegie’s Human Relations principle #1 is ‘Don’t criticize condemn or complain.’ The majority of Americans are abundantly blessed yet quick to complain. The next time you encounter a challenge or gripe, consider its inverse. For example, if you are angry you had to work late last night, reflect on your last vacation—those days spent not working and instead, snorkeling, relaxing, kayaking or whatever you love to do while on vacation. That job, which may require you to work late from time to time, provides the vacations you love. When you reflect on the good days, you’ll zip along while working a few late summer nights.
  3. Muster for luster. Everyone is entitled to his or her opinion, preferred way of doing things and so on. It’s natural for human beings to disagree whether at home, in the workplace or while out and about. Dale Carnegie’s Human Relations principle #10 is ‘Show respect for the other person’s opinion. Never say, “You’re wrong.”’ You have two ears and one mouth for a reason, so show respect by listening to everything that the person has to say. Then respond respectfully even if you think the person is completely wrong. Instead of saying, “You’re wrong” in condemnation, thank the person for sharing with you and if you feel like explaining your view, do it. Go a step further by reaching for at least one thing with which you agree, and kindly state it. Otherwise, move on.
  4. Try on the other person’s glasses. It’s easy to judge and can be challenging to empathize. Empathy, however, is one of the most graceful aspects of human existence. Dale Carnegie’s Human Relations principle #17 is ‘Try honestly to see things from the other person’s point of view.’ By considering the situation from the other person’s perspective, we grow exponentially. We reinforce trust in relationships; breakdown communication barriers and demonstrate that we are open-minded people worthy of the same respect. Another positive by-product—acknowledging that we perhaps are so fortunate to have not experienced the same trials.

This post is brought to you by the good folks at Dale Carnegie Training of Central Indiana, providers of professional development and management development courses and information in Indiana. We would love to connect with you on Facebook.

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